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In the 1960s, activists on many college campuses held events called “teach-ins” to raise awareness, foster dialogue, and inspire action against the Vietnam War.

Since then, teach-ins have been used as an activist tool for all sorts of issues, including climate change.

“It’s a form of education that really engages students in the issues of the day,” says Eban Goodstein, director of graduate programs in sustainability at Bard College in New York.

He’s helping organize the Worldwide Teach-in on Climate and Justice on March 30th.

Groups at hundreds of schools and organizations have planned panels and other events.

Goodstein says it’s a way for people from across disciplines to develop and share new ideas.

“An artist might talk about how artists are responding to climate change,” he says. “A religious studies professor can talk about stewardship. A business professor can talk about plunging costs for solar and storage. Economists can talk about the Green New Deal. Biologists can talk about ecological impacts.”

He hopes the events will inspire students around the world to take action on climate.

“It really is about student engagement with these ideas that will leave people energized,” he says.

Reporting credit: Sarah Kennedy/ChavoBart Digital Media