Hurricane Laura image
Infrared satellite view of Hurricane Laura at 8:41 a.m. EDT Wednesday, August 26, 2020. Laura had just been upgraded to a category 3 hurricane with 115 mph winds. (Image credit: University of Wisconsin/CIMSS)

Hurricane Laura powered its way to major hurricane status overnight, putting on an impressive display of rapid intensification over the very warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

Laura is headed towards a landfall expected Wednesday night or early Thursday morning in northeastern Texas or western Louisiana as a major category 4 hurricane, and is expected to cause “catastrophic” wind and storm surge damage, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC). Rain squalls from Laura’s outer spiral bands were already affecting the coasts of Texas and Louisiana on Wednesday morning, and they will increase in intensity throughout the day.

Laura rapidly intensified by an impressive 50 mph in the 24 hours ending at 11 a.m. EDT Wednesday, with the winds rising from 75 mph to 125 mph and the pressure falling from 990 mb to 956 mb. This far exceeds the definition of rapid intensification, which is a 24 mb drop in 24 hours. Buoy 42395, located just east of Laura’s eye on Wednesday morning, reported sustained winds of up to 76 mph, wind gusts as high as 107 mph, and a wave height of 37 feet (11 meters).

At 11 a.m. EDT Wednesday, Laura was already generating a storm surge of 1 – 3 feet along much of the Texas and Louisiana coasts; the largest surges, between 2.5 – 3 feet, were at Shell Beach, Louisiana, located to the southeast of New Orleans, and Freshwater Canal Locks, on the south-central coast of Louisiana. Laura’s storm surge can be tracked using the Trabus Technologies Storm Surge Live Tracker or the NOAA Tides and Currents page for Laura.

Satellite image
Figure 1. Visible GOES-16 satellite image of Hurricane Laura at 9:30 a.m. EDT Wednesday, August 26. (Image credit: NOAA/RAMMB)

Laura continues to rapidly intensify

At 11 a.m. EDT Wednesday, Laura was located over the waters of the central Gulf of Mexico, about 235 miles southeast of Galveston, Texas. These waters were a very warm 30 degrees Celsius (86°F). Laura was headed northwest at 15 mph with top sustained winds of 125 mph and a central pressure of 956 mb, putting it just 5 mph below category 4 strength.

Satellite images and data from the Hurricane Hunters showed that Laura has closed off a large eye about 30 miles in diameter. Intense thunderstorms with very cold cloud tops surrounded the eye and extended high into the atmosphere. The eye had not yet fully cleared out, which likely will occur by Wednesday afternoon as the hurricane continues to intensify.

High-level cirrus clouds were streaming out to the east and south of Laura, indicating good upper-level outflow on that side. Upper-level outflow was steadily improving to the north and west, showing that Laura was establishing a second outflow channel that connected up with the trough of low pressure over the central U.S. This improved outflow structure will help Laura intensify further on Wednesday afternoon. Laura was embedded in a moderately dry region of the atmosphere, with a mid-level relative humidity of 60%, but this dry air was not hindering the hurricane anymore, as the moderate wind shear of 10 – 15 knots affecting the storm was not high enough to drive the dry air into the well-developed inner core.

Figure 2
Figure 2. The 6Z Wednesday, August 26, 2020 forecast of the HWRF model, which successfully predicted Laura’s rapid intensification in previous runs. The model predicted a landfall around midnight Wednesday in western Louisiana as a category 4 hurricane with 140 mph winds and a central pressure of 937 mb. (Image credit: Tropical Tidbits)

Landfall near the Texas/Louisiana border imminent

There’s not much mystery on where Laura is going. The hurricane has made its expected turn to the northwest, and is headed toward a landfall near the Texas/Louisiana border around midnight Wednesday night. After landfall, Laura will turn to the north, following steering currents from a trough of low pressure over the central U.S. The rapidly weakening storm will then turn to the east on Friday, passing through the Tennessee Valley on its way to the mid-Atlantic coast, where it will move out to sea by Sunday.

Figure 3
Figure 3. Predicted wind threat from Hurricane Laura. (Image credit: National Weather Service Southern Region)

Intensification expected until just before landfall

Ocean temperatures are a very warm 30 degrees Celsius (86°F), and Laura will be passing over Gulf waters with very high heat content on Wednesday. Conditions for intensification will be very favorable until four to six hours before landfall, when strong upper-level winds from the trough of low-pressure steering Laura will bring a high 20 – 25 knots of wind shear and likely halt the intensification process. Interaction with land may also slow intensification at that time. Data from the Hurricane Hunters late Wednesday morning showed that Laura might be starting to develop concentric eyewalls, a process common in intense hurricanes, which leads to a temporary halt in intensification when the double eyewalls become fully developed. This process could slow down Laura’s intensification by Wednesday night. The top dynamical intensity models – the HWRF, HMON, and COAMPS -predicted in their 0Z and 6Z Wednesday runs that Laura would be a category 4 hurricane at landfall, with the 6Z COAMPS forecast calling for a category 5.

Laura a catastrophic storm surge threat

Figure 4
Figure 4. Predicted storm surge threat from Hurricane Laura. (Image credit: National Weather Service Southern Region)

Laura will drive a massive catastrophic storm surge to the coast, with the 11 a.m. EDT Wednesday NHC advisory calling for a peak surge of 15 – 20 feet along the western Louisiana coast. The magnitude of this storm surge will depend not only on how strong the winds are, the speed the storm is traveling, and the angle at which it approaches the coast, but also on the size of the storm. A large storm with winds blowing over a wide area of ocean will typically generate a higher storm surge that covers a larger area than a smaller hurricane.

The 11 a.m. EDT Wednesday NHC forecast called for Laura’s tropical storm-force winds to span a diameter of 220 nautical miles (nm) at landfall. For comparison, Hurricane Rita in 2005 – a low-end category 3 hurricane with 115 mph winds which drove a 10 – 15-foot storm surge to the southwest Louisiana coast – had tropical storm-force winds that spanned a diameter of 300 nm. Hurricane Ike in 2008 – a high-end category 2 hurricane with 110 mph winds that drove a storm surge of 15 – 20 feet to Texas’ Bolivar Peninsula – had a tropical storm-force wind field 390 nm across. (Thanks to weather.com’s Jon Erdman for this information) Given that Laura likely will be a much stronger storm than Rita at landfall, but smaller in areal size, a peak storm surge of 15 – 20 feet – larger than the 10 – 15-foot storm surge Rita brought to southwest Louisiana (see below) – is a reasonable forecast.

Inundation levels also will depend on whether Laura strikes at high or low tide. Tidal ranges are low in this part of the Gulf, however. The tidal range at Lake Charles, Louisiana is 1.5 feet, and high tide is at 6:09 a.m. CDT Thursday.

Figure 5
Figure 5. Holly Beach, Louisiana on November 16, 2005, after strong waves and storm surge currents from Hurricane Rita completely destroyed all 500 structures in the town and stripped away most of the vegetation, leaving deep scour channels parallel to the shoreline. Holly Beach was completely destroyed also in 1957 by the 12-foot storm surge of category 3 Hurricane Audrey. After both hurricanes, the town was partially rebuilt. (Image credit: Marvin Nauman/FEMA)
Figure 6
Figure 6. Simulated storm surge from Hurricane Rita of 2005, using water-level and barometric pressure data from sensors. (Image credit: USGS)

An impact greater than Hurricane Rita’s in 2005 likely

After peaking as a category 5 storm with 180 mph winds and a central pressure of 895 mb – the fourth lowest pressure ever measured for an Atlantic hurricane – Hurricane Rita weakened to a category 3 storm with 115 mph winds before making landfall in western Cameron Parish, Louisiana, near the Texas border, on September 24, 2005. Rita caused an estimated $25.2 billion in damage, making it the eleventh-costliest hurricane in U.S. history. Seven direct deaths were blamed on the storm, and the chaotic evacuation of Houston was blamed for 107 deaths.

Coastal storm surge When a hurricane threatens, don’t underestimate storm surge risk

The small town of Cameron (population 2,000 and elevation three feet) was the largest town along the stretch of southwest Louisiana coast that received Rita’s peak storm surge, estimated to be 10 – 15 feet. The storm surge destroyed 90% of the homes in Cameron, and destroyed all of the structures in Holly Beach (population 300), with the only human-made features remaining after the storm being power poles, concrete slabs, and roads. Rita’s surge penetrated more than 30 miles inland, reaching Interstate 10. The surge, combined with freshwater flooding, inundated downtown Lake Charles, located 30 miles from the ocean, up to six feet deep. Rita also produced a storm surge of 4 – 7 feet in coastal areas of southeastern Louisiana, flooding some spots that had already been impacted by the surge from Hurricane Katrina about one month earlier.

Posted August 26, 2020, at 12:35 p.m. EDT.

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Topics: Weather Extremes
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KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago
BULLETIN
Hurricane Laura Advisory Number  28
NWS National Hurricane Center Miami FL       AL132020
400 PM CDT Wed Aug 26 2020

...WIND AND WATER LEVELS INCREASING AS EXTREMELY DANGEROUS 
HURRICANE LAURA TAKES AIM AT THE NORTHWEST GULF COAST...
...CATASTROPHIC STORM SURGE, EXTREME WINDS, AND FLASH FLOODING
EXPECTED ALONG THE NORTHWEST GULF COAST TONIGHT...


SUMMARY OF 400 PM CDT...2100 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...27.9N 92.8W
ABOUT 155 MI...250 KM S OF LAKE CHARLES LOUISIANA
ABOUT 155 MI...250 KM SSE OF PORT ARTHUR TEXAS
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...145 MPH...230 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...NW OR 320 DEGREES AT 15 MPH...24 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...947 MB...27.97 INCHES
Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago

Apparently the projected surge may be enough to put the hurricane protection levee there to the test according to NWS and the local mayor. Specifically, wave heights may be enough to overtop.

KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago

comment image

longislander102
longislander102
6 months ago

Where can I find a site with live webcams from Lake Charles and other spots along the coast?

Louisa Landwehr
Louisa Landwehr
6 months ago
KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago

comment image

Wyatt Washburn
Wyatt Washburn
6 months ago

If you are in Lake Charles you will be under five hours of 100mph winds with the potential for sustained 125 with gusts much higher. Your home you think can take that, may very well not. If you can, get to a safe shelter out of the path of strongest winds away from the coast asap. 925mb, I’d just add I’ve written mph and mb probably 1500 times on the old blogs and never screwed it up. I cut and pasted my comment from last night forgetting the error. Point is this could rips homes apart JUST LIKE ANDREW DID IN DIRECT CORE PATH. Hope people take the right actions to protect life.

Last edited 6 months ago by Wyatt Washburn
anon
anon
6 months ago

How far would the cat 4 or 5 level winds expand outwards from the center – is that only within the eyewall? Or do they extend say 20 miles if the hurricane force winds extend out 70 miles? I hope Port Arthur makes it out ok – never been their – only know Janis Joplin was from there.

Wyatt Washburn
Wyatt Washburn
6 months ago

Oh my goodness. Typo error hate earlier as I try to sincerely warn of what is coming? Sheesh. The shunning is a thing so many get from the cool crowd. Most have known me for over a dozen years. Most too scared to be shunned too if they supported me. The shunning is what it is . One thing no one can do is ever question my sincerity. Sorry so many over the years never appreciated it in the least.

YCCusername1976
YCCusername1976
6 months ago

A lot of petrochemical industries are in the area to be most impacted by this hurricane’s landfall. Also some larger cities like Beaumont, Lake Charles, and Port Arthur. And smaller cities like Port Neches, Orange, and Bridge City. I hope that nobody has to ride this storm out because they lack the resources to evacuate.

Colorado Bob
Colorado Bob
6 months ago

47% of refining cap, , and 17% of of production.

KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago
Reply to  Colorado Bob

are we really gonna fire upon the Wahoo

looks that way

Qaz
Qaz
6 months ago

Is there any chance that this jogs west and puts the eastern eye wall on the Sabine River.

intense core
intense core
6 months ago

test

Sky Zagas
Sky Zagas
6 months ago

Looks like recon found 135 knots (155mph) in the NE quadrant of the eyeball.

943.2 now

Qaz
Qaz
6 months ago
Reply to  Sky Zagas

23 millibars in 5 hours. 5 millibars an hour with some wind shear and land interaction. It would be tough to make Cat 5.

There is a non zero chance, but is is unlikely.

Sky Zagas
Sky Zagas
6 months ago
Reply to  Qaz

They found 155 mph winds in the northeast quadrant. Not to sound like a doomcaster but it’s literally 1 mph short and pressure keeps dropping. It will probably make the jump at this rate. Regardless this will be a devastating system regardless whether it be a category four or five. It’s truly terrifying to see how quickly the system ramped up.

Gman
Gman
6 months ago
Reply to  Sky Zagas

Shear is starting to hit it from the west so unlikely to hit Cat 5. Max winds won’t matter much at this point.

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago

Based on latest gauges and bulletins, sections of Highway 27/82 already has as much as a foot of water over it (maybe more in a few places) from Sabine Pass to areas east of Cameron. Illustrates both how high the water is already running and how low/flat the coast is in this area.

Andre Brooks
Andre Brooks
6 months ago

943.2 mb
(~ 27.86 inHg)

Terry
Terry
6 months ago
Reply to  Andre Brooks

cat 5 SOON?

Skyepony
6 months ago

Laura

08231926LauraStill.png
Terry
Terry
6 months ago
Reply to  Skyepony

beauty and the beast!

Andre Brooks
Andre Brooks
6 months ago

945.4 mb
(~ 27.92 inHg)

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago

Water level station at Sabine Pass is reporting 2.3 ft. of inundation above ground level.

intense core
intense core
6 months ago

NHC issuing hourly updates now. Latest max winds – 140 MPH. Latest central pressure – 948. Moving NW at 16 MPH

Last edited 6 months ago by intense core
Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago

Something about me typing in a location reference (text only) is preventing a post from appearing. Anyhow… an hour ago, a certain station on the coast was reporting inundation of 3.2 feet of water above ground along with 35 mph sustained winds.

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  Barfolomew

Finally! It posted. Location is eugene island, about 15 miles east of cameron, la.

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  Barfolomew

location is about 15 miles east of Cameron, Louisiana. When type in the name of the station, the post is blocked for some reason. Name of station is Eu##ne Island. As close as it will let me get.

Last edited 6 months ago by Barfolomew
NW AZ weatherwatcher
NW AZ weatherwatcher
6 months ago

Sry YCC (too many hrs watching Laura RI, too little sleep), that was a response meant for a posts at WU about a place to donate other than the Red Cross, and the Vermillion Sheriff’s dire warning about staying (name, address, S.S.#, and next of kin in ziplock bag in pocket now, so they can identify, if and when they find their bodies, if they decided to stay). We all know the realities, many will be forced to stay due to also very dire monetary considerations. While our congresscritters delayed, and sat on their thumbs….now sadly, many no doubt will die and suffer.

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago

1 hour ago, Eugene Island NOS station reported 3.2 ft of inundation above ground and 35 mph sustained winds.

intense core
intense core
6 months ago
...300 PM CDT POSITION UPDATE...
...CATASTROPHIC STORM SURGE, EXTREME WINDS, AND FLASH FLOODING 
EXPECTED ALONG THE NORTHWEST GULF COAST THIS EVENING...
...WATER LEVELS RISING ALONG THE COAST OF SOUTHEAST TEXAS AND 
LOUISIANA...

Water levels are beginning to rise along the coast of Texas. A 
National Ocean Service water level station at Sabine Pass, Texas, 
recently reported about 2.3 feet of inundation above ground level. 

The Eugene Island, Louisiana, NOS station recently measured 
sustained winds of 36 mph (58 km/h) and a gust to 45 mph (72 km/h).


SUMMARY OF 300 PM CDT...2000 UTC...INFORMATION
----------------------------------------------
LOCATION...27.6N 92.7W
ABOUT 175 MI...280 KM SSE OF PORT ARTHUR TEXAS
ABOUT 175 MI...280 KM S OF LAKE CHARLES LOUISIANA
MAXIMUM SUSTAINED WINDS...140 MPH...220 KM/H
PRESENT MOVEMENT...NW OR 315 DEGREES AT 16 MPH...26 KM/H
MINIMUM CENTRAL PRESSURE...948 MB...27.99 INCHES
KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago

comment image

Ern
Ern
6 months ago
Reply to  KOTG(MOD)

WOW😱Trouble ahead.

KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago
Reply to  Ern

comment image

Terry
Terry
6 months ago
Reply to  KOTG(MOD)

yeah! ready set learn!

Terry
Terry
6 months ago
Reply to  KOTG(MOD)

ballin!

NW AZ weatherwatcher
NW AZ weatherwatcher
6 months ago

Please tell me Sloppy Steve Bannon is not involved.

I pray everyone is heeding the dire warnings to get far away from Laura’s Surge and Winds. That was a very serious post by the Sheriff.

Anyone not taking the extreme growth of this major has not been paying attention, but the timing and delays, and garbage from certain so called congressional leaders and the cutoff of extra but extremely needed unemployment dollars and a second round of covid stimulus checks to people in dire need, will cost lives in the hours and weeks ahead. Those Congresscritters should be held directly responsible, along with their idiot cult leader. Trillions propping up the markets for the 1 percenters safely out of harms way though.

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago

Any reason my comments require “moderator approval”?

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  Barfolomew

If I try to post anything more substantial than the above, the comment is “moderated”.

Last edited 6 months ago by Barfolomew
Skyepony (mod)
Skyepony (mod)
6 months ago
Reply to  Barfolomew

Haven’t seen any of your comments awaiting or needing moderated. What are you trying to post and how?

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  Skyepony (mod)

Just a simple text. Typed in info regarding an update provided via Eugene Island. No images, no cut-and-paste

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  Skyepony (mod)

My first attempt to respond was also moderated. No images, just 3 lines of text.

Skyepony (mod)
Skyepony (mod)
6 months ago
Reply to  Barfolomew

No one is moderating your comments. They might not be rendoring correctly. Are you trying to upload a picture or share one by right clicking on a pic online and selecting copy image and paste that here. Uploading needs to be 7mb or smaller. Sharing it needs hosted on a https secure site…might could edit in the s. Doesn’t always work. Hot linking has varied results. If you post a pic in a way incompadable with the platform your picture may simply not post or it could end up being 6 pages of text (which I just cleaned up after myself).

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  Skyepony (mod)

Thanks! Was not trying to post an image but will be mindful. Just 3 lines of text. Weird. Apparently, it does not like me talking about Eugene Island for some reason.

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  Skyepony (mod)

Thanks! Was not trying to post an image but will be mindful. Just 3 lines of text. Weird. Apparently, it does not like me talking about E####e Island for some reason. I am leaving the letters out to see if it will let me post.

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago

This was issued around 30 min. ago. Sorry if already posted here:

Water levels are beginning to rise along the coast of Louisiana. A 
National Ocean Service water level station at Eugene Island, 
Louisiana, recently reported about 3.2 feet of inundation above 
ground level. 

The Eugene Island NOS station also recently measured sustained winds 
of 35 mph (56 km/h) and a gust to 41 mph (66 km/h).

Skyepony (mod)
Skyepony (mod)
6 months ago

comment image

Last edited 6 months ago by Skyepony (mod)
Terry
Terry
6 months ago
Reply to  Skyepony (mod)

wow

Christopher Cartwright
Christopher Cartwright
6 months ago

Check “street views” on google of the areas impacted by this storm later today
Heartbreaking

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago

Echos of Michael here.

Unknownunknown
Unknownunknown
6 months ago
Reply to  Barfolomew

…. Couldn’t say forsure

terry
terry
6 months ago

thx for updates Jeff!

KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago

comment image

terry
terry
6 months ago
Reply to  KOTG(MOD)

terry
right now
Awaiting for approval

thx for updates Jeff! still having issues posting

KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago

comment image

terry
terry
6 months ago
Reply to  KOTG(MOD)

nice!

Christopher Cartwright
Christopher Cartwright
6 months ago

A smaller GIF works…7 frames

goes16_ir_13L_202008261812.gif
HadesGodWyvern
HadesGodWyvern
6 months ago

Japan Meteorological Agency
Tropical Cyclone Advisory #43 – 3:00 AM JST August 27 2020
TYPHOON BAVI (T2008)
=================================================
Yellow Sea

At 18:00 PM UTC, Typhoon Bavi (965 hPa) located at 36.9N 125.3E has 10 minute sustained winds of 70 knots with gusts of 100 knots. The cyclone is reported as moving north at 17 knots.

Storm Force Winds
====================
90 nm from the center in eastern quadrant
60 nm from the center in western quadrant

Gale Force Winds
=================
210 nm from the center in eastern quadrant
150 nm from the center in western quadrant

Dvorak Intensity: T4.5-

Forecast and Intensity
=======================
24 HRS: 45.9N 128.0E – Extratropical Low overland northeastern China

Bahahurican
Bahahurican
6 months ago
Reply to  HadesGodWyvern

How close to landfall is this?

Richie
Richie
6 months ago

Pressure is down to the 947-948 mb range as per recon, 5-6 mb in just over an hour. And no real sign of a double wind maxima so she could approach Category 5 strength in the next few hours. This would not be a storm to take chances with!

KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago

CAT FIVE

Terry
Terry
6 months ago
Reply to  KOTG(MOD)

yes u called it ! 3 days ago!

KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago

comment image RI FLAG ON

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  KOTG(MOD)

It’s a short loop, but not seeing a much in the way of internal mesos roaming inside the eye….and check out those gravity waves.

Last edited 6 months ago by Barfolomew
Skyepony (mod)
Skyepony (mod)
6 months ago
Reply to  Barfolomew

You can see the mesos on the longer loop.. https://twitter.com/SammyHadiWx/status/1298696551305547778

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  Skyepony (mod)

Yep- there they are.

Skyepony (mod)
Skyepony (mod)
6 months ago

From recon Laura just dropped from 950mb to 944.7mb. 5.3mb in 1 hr 35mins.

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  Skyepony (mod)

Wow.

HadesGodWyvern
HadesGodWyvern
6 months ago
Reply to  Skyepony (mod)

2020AUG26 183000 6.4 933.5 124.6 6.4 6.3 6.3 NO LIMIT OFF OFF 17.34 -66.87 EYE 23 IR 78.4 27.42 92.47 COMBO GOES16 37.4

getting close to what RSMC Miami ADT estimated pressure

NorthOfAtlanta
NorthOfAtlanta
6 months ago

Hello, just trying to figure out how this works.

SFJenn21
SFJenn21
6 months ago
Reply to  NorthOfAtlanta

How do you create a username?

Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago

Yikes. Was hoping that dry air entrainment might help at least continue to delay the formation of core around the center of circulation for a longer period (as it did most of the day yesterday). This is bad. Really bad. The size and right side bias of the convection/wind field is going to ensure a massive amount of water will be headed toward the shore with little where else to go except inland.

NMgal
NMgal
6 months ago

You can see drone footage from yesterday (8/25) of Holly Beach here:
https://youtu.be/H-S8BIsx-iE
It will be, um, interesting to see what it looks like tomorrow…

Last edited 6 months ago by NMgal
Barfolomew
Barfolomew
6 months ago
Reply to  NMgal

Glad they are gathering day-before imagery. Very helpful in studying damage patterns which in turn helps inform better coastal management practices and building codes.

NMgal
NMgal
6 months ago
Reply to  NMgal

reposting still from video

hollybeach.png
Zaphod
Zaphod
6 months ago
Reply to  NMgal

Will be interesting to see if the houses on stilts are high enough. Sometimes a few will make it through.

Mediarologist
Mediarologist
6 months ago
Reply to  Zaphod

I think that’s all going to be gone.

Urca de Lima
Urca de Lima
6 months ago
Reply to  NMgal

You build your house on sticks, you take your chances.

Christopher Cartwright
Christopher Cartwright
6 months ago

So?
Explosive intensification, anyone?
“As ugly as it gets ” was hyping it?
Maria
Dorian
and others , now, every year.
120 knots wind..and intensifying till landfall.

Some people live in hurricane regions (my case) and believe in science, knowledge and the NHC

And wait another 2 decades.
Did you notice the SSTs in the arctic +6C over average? wait till this comes to the GOM

Time of consequences is upon us.
We have been warned.

Eddi Haskell
Eddi Haskell
6 months ago

See article from March 2020
“Abnormally warm Gulf of Mexico could intensify the upcoming tornado and hurricane seasons” (Gulf was avg 3 degrees above normal then)

https://www.inquirer.com/wires/wp/weather-hurricanes-tornados-20200331.html#:~:text=The%20Gulf%20of%20Mexico%20sea,even%20higher%20in%20recent%20months.&text=Now%2C%20they're%20about%20three,in%20the%20months%20to%20come.

ChiThom
ChiThom
6 months ago

All your fore-warnings have been vindicated.

Sunrisemama
Sunrisemama
6 months ago

I really hope those in evacuation zones left, I think the window for escape is closing, good luck to all about to be impacted.

Jarhead6012
Jarhead6012
6 months ago

This looks to be catastrophic, I was shocked to see how fast it strengthened!!!

KOTG(MOD)
KOTG(MOD)
6 months ago

comment image

Eddi Haskell
Eddi Haskell
6 months ago
Reply to  KOTG(MOD)

Music videos may be nice during quiet times, but we try to stay away from extraneous content postings when lives are at threat whenever Hurricanes and other storms post a huge imminent threat to life within the next 48 hours. Thanks.

Colorado Bob
Colorado Bob
6 months ago

Be glad you are not on the I-10 between Baton Rouge and Houston. 

Dirk
Dirk
6 months ago

Thanks Dr. Masters, i only can hope people did prepare well or atleast left the area.

fr0sty
fr0sty
6 months ago

NOAA’s servers are crying for mercy.

SuzannaDanna
SuzannaDanna
6 months ago

Test